Archive for the ‘Gluten free/Dairy free’ Category

Curried Broccoli Salad (from Soul Cookbook)

June 5th, 2019 4 Comments

  Soul by Todd Richards was a winter acquisition from Redbery bookstore in Cable, WI—one of those awesome small independent bookstores that we need to keep alive. It was hard to resist the warming menus and ingredient lists when it was 20 below outside. Tangent story–my friend went on a for-hire fishing boat in Florida to escape the winter and commented to the captain that the temperature in their northern home was 15 below. The captain said, “Below what?”  

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Spring Feasts

April 19th, 2019 No Comments

    Just living is not enough… one must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.”  . ~Hans Christian Andersen     First, a few delectable moments of spring from last weekend. While we sisters visited inside our little rented getaway house, outside these beauties in the front yard opened up during the night. What a gift! I love how they arrive while everything else is still gray and brown around them, an appreciated contrast. Contrast is an interesting thing,

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Asparagus with Curried Honey Mustard Vinaigrette

April 4th, 2019 2 Comments

  A Springtime Soirée. My friend Patsy and I have a little tradition of setting a date then seeing what we have in our fridge, freezer, or pantries to create an evening of delicious Small Bites. It might be a cup of pintos, salmon, broccoli, olives, soup, cheese…even when it feels like I have nothing special to bring somehow between us the combination of treats works perfectly together. It’s amazing what abundance can happen when sharing. Without fail they have

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Coconut Red Lentil Soup

March 13th, 2019 3 Comments

  Cheery and light, this is a great soup for any season.     But first, a few more pictures of SNOW. Keweenaw Peninsuala style, that is, as in 274 inches this year (yep, that’s right…nearly 23 FEET of snow!). So far.        These are not drifts from the wind or snowplows…it’s just snow. Somewhere back there through the tunnel is a door to the house. Needless to say the Great Bear Chase ski marathon was not cancelled due

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Wilted Red Cabbage with Feta

January 23rd, 2019 No Comments

  Oh Deborah, we love you. As I mentioned earlier, I’m in a phase of sorting through the cookbooks—culling then re-exploring the ones that are staying. Different foods catch our eye at different times, so it’s a great experiment to pull out the books and give them another round of attention. Deborah Madison is always a favorite, and as we are now in the winter wonderland I wanted to bring ideas for hearty vegetable dishes that were easy and could

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African Peanut Soup

January 9th, 2019 6 Comments

  We made a version of this soup in the Deli but I seem to have misplaced the recipe so I’ve been trying to recreate it lately. I started with the basic ingredients of a classic peanut soup—peanut butter or ground nuts with sweet potato and tomato—then went from there. The recipe is based on soups common in western Africa, but interestingly those three ingredients originated in the Americas.   Peanuts probably originated in Brazil or Peru where there are

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Chile Glazed Yams and Rick Bayless

December 20th, 2018 3 Comments

  It’s easy to spend hours reading books by Rick Bayless. Restauranteur author, educator, and host of PBS’s Mexico: One Plate at a Time….needless to say he’s a busy guy. Rick has lived and still spends time in Mexico, and does a respectful job at bringing traditional Mexican fare to the spotlight with a modern interpretation, not to mention the recipes with side notes are both incredible and accessible. His restaurants include the extensive Frontera family of sites, Topolobampo, Red O,

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Miso Garlic Mushrooms

December 11th, 2018 No Comments

  My sister sent this link to me and it sounded delicious so I gave it a try at Thanksgiving. And whaddayaknow…it WAS DELICIOUS! These are great as a side dish, or skewered with adorable bamboo skewers on a holiday hors d’ oeuvres table. I go in phases of perusing others’ food ideas, whether it be blogs, books, or restaurants. Sometimes all we need is the one ingredient used in a new way to give inspiration or delight. This recipe

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Winter Arugula Salad

December 5th, 2018 4 Comments

    Lately the visits to my father often include some kind of looking-through-things session, a show-and-tell of his life and history that he seems to enjoy sharing. Not long ago he dug out his carving tools and pocket knives, many of which he had altered dramatically to suit his carving needs. A few were left alone as true pocket or belt-holster tools but you can spot the three carvers. Geez, I wonder where I inherited an appreciation for a

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Skordalia

November 28th, 2018 No Comments

  This sounded so Scandinavian to me, but that’s because I live in a Norski kind of town. Skordalia is a Greek garlic-potato-nut mash that is so tasty and easy I have no idea why it isn’t made everywhere. It would be a great little addition to a Holiday party, or part of a hearty supper in the early darkness of these winter months. Naturally there are oodles of variations on this—some use dried bread instead of potato, some have

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Butternut Squash Fritters

November 6th, 2018 2 Comments

  So many veggies to fritter, so little time. Shred them up, add eggs, seasonings, and something floury, then fry or fry-and-bake. It’s a great way to eat veggies when you’re craving something decadent. The photo is from a breakfast at the Dug Road Inn last week, along with local greens with pea shoots and a frittata from hens living about 30 miles away.   I was in a parking lot in Iowa City a few days ago and the

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Roasted Pears with Chile Turmeric Oil

October 24th, 2018 No Comments

  While perusing the NOPI cook book I noticed Burrata with Blood Oranges and Lavender Oil looked divine. I suppose that sparked the motivation to make this savory oil drizzled on a fruit—-sometimes we have to take inspiration wherever we can and utilize that which is around us. These pears are from the Farmers Market, they are the Gourmet variety which are hardy in cold regions and the window of opportunity for fresh fruit is only two or three weeks. You

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Nopi’s Ginger Tomatoes

October 10th, 2018 No Comments

  This book made me so happy. I’m involved in other activities so that I fall behind on the goings-on of the larger Food World, but perhaps that keeps me from becoming jaded and makes the discoveries that I do encounter even more magical and appreciated. So I am still elated when I come across works of art. Yotam Ottolenghi is a name you may recognize from his London restaurants and numerous cookbooks.  Jerusalem has been on my want-list— he

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Indian Pickled Vegetable Salad

October 3rd, 2018 No Comments

  There are innumerable pickling directions you can go, most regions of the world had either a fermentation process or made fermented liquids (like vinegar) to quick pickle and lightly preserve. I’ve been reading about Korean versions of pickled veggies and getting excited to try them, but for the Seed Savers Conference Dinner I wanted an Indian direction to the seasonings since it would be servedwith Smoked Lamb, Chickpea Masala, and Pilau.   The most surprising addition idea to me

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Pilau with Cardamom and Ginger

August 21st, 2018 No Comments

    The many faces of Pilaf. A pilaf is usually made with rice that is cooked in a savory broth then a variety of vegetables, spices, dried fruits and sometimes meat added to the savory grain.  The ingredients range depending on regions and availability, and the name of the dish adapts as well: Pilav, pallao, pilau, pulao, pulaav, palaw, palavu, plov, palov, polov, polo, polu, kurysh, fulao, fulab, and fulav. The grain is cooked in broth, herb seasoned water, or fruit juices to

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Purslane

August 15th, 2018 No Comments

  Yep, that’s right, purslane. If you’re not a farmer, grounds keeper, or gardener this word will probably not elicit an emotional reaction, it will merely be another possibility of omega-3-fatty-acid-packed greens for your table. If, however, you are of the variety of people who clashes with plants that they have not intended to be a part of their lives, your jaw may drop in surprise to know that one of your rivals that you have agonized over is not only very edible,

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Korean Cucumber Salad, or Oi much’im

August 8th, 2018 2 Comments

  This salad is a great side dish with a little kick for a hot summer’s day, and another step for me to learn more about the marinated quick pickles of Korea. They also say this salad is a good substitute for kimchi if you’re needing a fix and cannot make it or find any nearby.     Red Pepper Powder, or Gochugaru, is prevalent in Korean cooking and is a main ingredient of this salad. In Korea it’s not uncommon that people raise their own peppers

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Chimichurri

July 31st, 2018 2 Comments

    This is one of those recipes that I have no idea who to credit other than the many Peoples of Argentina. It’s a national condiment, used as a marinade or eaten with grilled beef or other meats for which Argentina is also well known. They say the name is from the word tximitxurri of the Basque language meaning ‘a mix of several things’. A fascinating little side note: the Basque language (of northern Spain and southern France) appears to not be

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Watermelon Gazpacho

July 17th, 2018 2 Comments

    Yep. It’s summer.  Sultry, steamy, sunny, sizzling, sweaty and sometimes stifling…if it were any more humid last week the air would have simply transformed to water and we would have been left to fend for our gill-less selves in the new ocean. In these days of Deep Summer I walk by the bundles of skis by the front door, tidily packed in their bags for the warm-season storage, and that time of peace and exercise seems an elusive world far out of

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Sesame Salt

July 10th, 2018 No Comments

  After visiting friends in the Bay Area last fall and being introduced to and discovering that I love Korean home-cooking, folk music, and bar food, I came home vowing to learn more. A gifted Korean cookbook happened next, and now I’m finally getting around to trying my hand at a few dishes.   Ingredients are not all equal. While visiting these friends in Berkeley I was treated to fresh sesame seeds, sesame oil, and red chili paste that were grown on

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