Flax Seed Crisps

January 17th, 2017 3 Comments

img_3964

 

Completely inspired by Magnus Nilsson of Fäviken in Sweden, these crisps are simple with a most intriguing look.  In his cookbook Fäviken, Magnus explains that he started with thicker versions using more types of seeds, then evolved the crisp towards thinner version using only flax.  His cookbook photo shows the delicate see-through results.  Since I was making these as a traveling snack I brought it back to a thicker version so they would be more sturdy and road-worthy.

 

“Road-worthy”??  Yes!  We are once again pointing our the ski tips northward, packing the now 21-year old 4Runner to and beyond the roof, and beginning the annual journey into snow-coddled woodlands and cross country ski trails.  And saunas and wood stoves, let’s not forget those.  Photos and stories from the Snow Chronicles yet to come!

(But also bringing umbrella and rubber boots…it looks like a frighteningly warm week ahead.)

 

img_4005

 

img_4006

 

Flax seeds have the Superpower of creating a viscous texture when soaked in water—gluey and sticky can be very handy sometimes, especially when attempting vegan or egg-free baking.  Combine viscosity of flax with the gloop of potato starch and you have a mix that will bind.

 

img_3955

 

 

img_3961

 

img_3986

img_3999b

 

 

Bon Voyage! 

 

Flax Crisps

Prep Time: 20 minutes to soak, 10 minutes to prep for baking

Bake Time: 30-60 minutes depending on the thickness

 

Mix together in a bowl until smooth and dissolved:

5 Tablespoons Potato Starch

1/2 cup water

Mix in:

1 cup Flax Seeds

1 teaspoon Sea Salt

Pour over the mixture and stir or whisk until smooth:

2 1/4 cups Boiling Water

Let rest for about 20 minutes.

Lightly butter a cookie sheet or line with parchment paper (NOT wax paper) and pour the gelatinous mixture onto the pan.  Spread thin.

Bake at 300 degrees Fahrenheit until it is completely dry, about 35-45 minutes depending on the thickness of the spread.  Remove from the oven, break it apart and flip it over, then bake until lightly crispy but not burned.

Eat as is, or try the Magnus method and lightly sprinkle it with vinegar then let sit to dry.

Serve by themselves or with a dip.

 

 

 

“Optimism is a strategy for making a better future,” 
“Because unless you believe that the future can be better, you are 
unlikely to step up and take responsibility for making it so. If you assume 
there is no hope, you guarantee there will be no hope.”

~Noam Chomsky 

 

img_3996

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

  1. Alice says:

    Exciting recipe and profound quote by Chomsky! Happy skiing, Ruth and Scott!

Leave a Reply