Pumpkin Coconut Cardamom Custard

November 7th, 2012 2 Comments

 

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I am thinking about sweet festive treats, and I’m also looking over at my massive pile of winter squash.  Hmm….

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Custards are a funny thing, some diners love them and some do not.   They say that people cannot change, but I say that occasionally they can.  Do you need a few adjectives to help you open up to new possibilities?

Silky smooth, velvety, sensuous, satiny, luscious….do I have your attention yet?  Excuse me while I wipe the drool from my chin.

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There are many delectable custard pies out there, but after reading those adjectives about the filling I must beg the question, “Who needs the stinkin’ crust??”

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 ORANGE

 

The title says “Pumpkin”,  but you can use either pie pumpkins or winter squash.  I liberally lump pumpkins and winter squash into the same cooking category—but I’m not alone.  Much of the pumpkin pie filling in cans is actually squash.

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Which varieties to use?

I like ones that have a slightly dry texture, are dense, and packed with flavor.  Some of my favorites have been Buttercup, Kabocha, Turban, Mooregold, Jarrahdale, Blue Hubbard, Pie Pumpkins, and Red Kuri.   There are many factors determining why a squash is flavorful (soil, rain, temperature, etc) but generally these varieties are sweet and great for soups or custards/pies..

 

 

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Ah the water bath, once again.  This is from the earlier post about savory cheesecakes:

Baking in a water bath:  A water bath, a.k.a. ‘bain-marie’ (bath of Mary), is a method of gentle cooking in a pan that is immersed in another pan of hot water to help distribute the heat more evenly, whether it be on the stovetop or oven.

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Don’t be intimidated!  The water is what helps regulate the cooking process.  The biggest trick is to not slosh the liquid into the custard cups.  Don’t sneeze or use loud air horns while handling the pan.

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This recipe was concocted for our Edible Alien Theatre performance this spring—winter squash was a way we could serve a local ingredient in March, and the coconut allowed all of my dairy-free friends to eat with abandon.

I guarantee that you will never suspect that no dairy treads within this luscious pot!

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Pumpkin Coconut Cardamom Custard

Prep Time: 15 minutes (does not include baking the squash)  Bake Time: 35-45 minutes

 

In a tea kettle, pre-heat water to use for the water bath. 

Beat together in a bowl:

4 Eggs

1/2 c. Sugar

1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt

Whisk in:

12 oz. Coconut Milk (the more fat the better)

1 cup Pie Pumpkin or Squash, cooked and pureed (here is more on Cooking Squash)

1 teaspoon Vanilla

1/8 teaspoon Nutmeg, grated or ground

1/8 teaspoon Cardamom, ground

Pour into eight 4 oz. ramekins.

Pour some hot water into a roasting or baking pan, then set the filled ramekins into the water bath.

If needed, carefully add more hot water so it covers at least half of the ramekins—ideally it should come up to the custard line.  

Bake at 350 degrees for 35-45 minutes—-the center should jiggle slightly when shaken.

Remove from oven, and remove the ramekins from the water bath.  Let them cool.

Eat them at room temperature (but store in the refrigerator). 

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2 Comments

  1. Heather says:

    Thank you Ruthie, as always, perfect timing.
    Diners will be sending their gratitude, en mass, Thanksgiving Day.
    You are magnificent, a culinary master pie ce.
    lovelovelove~hh

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