Yellow Pepper Pesto

July 14th, 2015 No Comments

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Colorful tasty vegetables or herbs ground into a paste…’pesto’ is a loosely used term.  The word pesto comes from the Italian word pestare’ meaning to pound or crush.  Texture has such an impact on the way we perceive and taste a dish, and crushing or pureeing helps create a silky coating that adheres well to sauce-vehicles like pastas and vegetables.  

 

This is a light and lovely spread that could be served over fish, noodles, vegetables, or chicken and has the extra bonus of being a cheery color.  It could also add that magic element to a soup.  Roasting the peppers gives it a depth of flavor that you won’t regret, but don’t be intimidated by the steps.

 

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Yep, right on the gas stovetop, or into the oven broiler if you don’t have a gas stove.

Grilling is better than either indoor methods.

 

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Char!  Char!

 

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Let the peppers rest in a paper bag for 15 minutes to continue cooking.

 

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Remove from the bag and peel away the charred crisps and Voilá you have beautifully roasted peppers.  The rest is easy peasy.

 

 

 

Yellow Pepper Pesto

Roast Time: 15 minutes

Prep Time: 15 minutes

 

Grill, broil or char on a gas stove:

3 Yellow Peppers

When there is visible charring on the skin, remove from heat and place in a paper bag, folding the top shut to capture the steam.  Let sit 30 minutes. 

Remove from bag and peel off the skin with your hand.  The charred skin may flake away. 

Cut open the peppers, remove stem and seeds, and place in a food processor with:

1 clove Garlic, minced

(optional) 2 Tablespoons Pine Nuts, Sunflower Seeds or Walnuts

Pulse chop the peppers and garlic, then turn on the processor and drizzle in:

1/2 cup Olive Oil

Blend it for a minute to lightly emulsify, then add:

1/3 – 1/2 cup Parmesan Cheese

Salt and Pepper to taste

Serve on pasta, vegetables, fish, chicken, or with whatever else you might combine with pesto.

 

 

 

Spoon by Frank Wright, and small bowl by unknown potter who worked in the Warren Mackenzie studio.

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